Recordkeeping

A hallmark of complying with the OSH Act is to keep accurate records relating to workplace injuries, illnesses, health, and safety. The following are standard OSHA recordkeeping requirements:

  • Employers must maintain records in each establishment of occupational injuries and illnesses as they occur and make those records accessible to employees.
  • Employers must report within 8 hours the death of any employee from a work-related incident or the inpatient hospitalization of three or more employees as a result of a work-related incident.
  • Employers must post in February each year an annual summary of occupational injuries and illnesses for each establishment.
  • Upon request, employers must provide pertinent recordkeeping records for inspection and copying by any representative of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, or the state during any investigation, research, or statistical compilation.
  • Each employer must complete the OSHA 101 form (Supplement Record of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses) within six working days from the time the employer learns of the work-related injury or illness. Employers with ten or fewer employees are exempt from maintaining this form unless notified otherwise.
  • Employers must log each recordable occupational injury and illness on the OSHA 200 form within six working days from the time the employer learns of it. Employers with ten or fewer employees are exempt from maintaining this form unless notified otherwise.

The following industries are exempt from some of OSHA’s recordkeeping and reporting requirements: most retail trade, general merchandise stores, food stores, service industries except hotels and other lodging places, repair services, amusement and recreation services, health services, insurance, real estate, and finance.